Yellow Chicken Curry Recipe (And A Review of Everyday Paleo Thai Cuisine)

Yellow curry chicken slow-carb recipe

Yellow curry chicken slow-carb recipe
One of my favorite cuisines is Thai, and I’ve found you can generally find decent options in a Thai restaurant. Sometimes you might need to ask for it without rice, but beyond that the only thing you’ll have to be careful of is sugar in sauces.

Or you can make it yourself at home. I recently bought a cookbook that’s making that much easier for me to do.

This recipe comes from Sarah Fragoso’s newest book, Everyday Paleo Thai Cuisine.

Delicious Thai recipes to make your slow-carb diet more interesting

I want to take a second to tell you about the book. While it’s primarily a Thai cooking book that also happens to be fully compliant to the Paleo diet, the vast majority of her recipes are slow-carb friendly or are very easily made slow-carb friendly (such as not using the honey or maple syrup she suggests). It’s by far the best cookbook I’ve found for some really exciting slow-carb cooking.

This is the real deal. She actually lived in Thailand for something like 6 weeks studying with Thai chefs to make authentic food, some of which you can’t even find in restaurants outside of Thailand.

She covers the gamut, from stir fries, curries, soups, appetizers, and even condiments that you’d find anywhere in Thailand. I fell in love with her condiment section and made quite a few of them right off the bat.

If you’re interested in the book, head on over to Amazon to check it out.

Here’s one of the slow-carb friendly recipes

We easily cook from this book once a week, and here’s the latest one we’ve done. It’s pretty simple and doesn’t take long at all to cook.

A few notes:

  • The original recipe calls for a curry paste that you can find in the book, but I didn’t have all of the ingredients for it, and I didn’t want to have to give you a second recipe that you’d have to make to prepare this meal. So what you see below is my way of getting the flavors from the curry paste without actually making it.
  • This chicken works best when eaten on a bed of cauliflower rice, but some cabbage sliced thin (so it’s kind of like noodles) does really well as a stir fry.

Yellow Chicken Curry #4hb #slowcarb

Rating: 41

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 2 servings

Yellow Chicken Curry #4hb #slowcarb

Ingredients

  • 2 Tbsp cooking fat (olive oil, coconut oil, lard, etc)
  • 1/2 Tbsp garlic, minced
  • 1/2 tsp ginger, minced
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 Tbsp yellow curry powder
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 Tbsp water or chicken stock
  • 1-1.5 lbs chicken, cut into smaller pieces
  • 2 Tbsp coconut milk (if you like that flavor)
  • 1-2 Thai hot chiles, sliced thin (depending on your spice tolerance)
  • salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. In a large pan (a wok is best but not necessary), melt the fat over medium heat. When the pan is up to temperature, toss in the garlic, ginger, cumin, curry powder, and fish sauce and saute for several seconds until fragrant.
  2. Add the water or broth and simmer for another 30 seconds
  3. Add the chicken, salt, and pepper and stir fry for about 5 minutes or until the chicken is fully cooked.
  4. When the chicken is done and most of the water has cooked out, add the coconut oil and chiles and stir fry it for just a few seconds to heat it up.
  5. Serve over a bed of cauliflower rice and enjoy!

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Sausage And Pepper Slow Cooker Stew #slowcarb #4hb #recipes

Sausage And Pepper Slow Cooker Stew

Sausage And Pepper Slow Cooker Stew
On the last Sunday of every month, we get together at church and have a covered-dish dinner. There’s always a pretty good selection, and there are a few families that take healthful foods, but we’re never guaranteed to be able to make an entire slow-carb meal out of the foods people end up taking.

My wife and I have been taking matters into our own hands and make sure there’s *something* we could eat and feel good about, so we’re always on the lookout for great recipes that scale well and are part of a healthful diet.

She was given a Paleo slow cooker recipe book for Christmas, and this recipe was just what we needed. It’s such a simple recipe that I was blown away by how many people put forth an effort to find out who made it and come up to us to tell us how good it was.

Healthful foods for the win!

Sausage And Pepper Slow Cooker Stew #slowcarb #4hb #recipes

Rating: 41

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Cook Time: 3 hours

Total Time: 3 hours, 20 minutes

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Sausage And Pepper Slow Cooker Stew #slowcarb #4hb #recipes

Ingredients

  • 1 lb sweet Italian sausage
  • 1 lb hot Italian sausage
  • 1 Tbsp clarified butter
  • 1 onion, thinly sliced
  • 2 bell peppers, seeded and chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 14.5 oz can stewed tomatoes
  • 2 cups chicken stock or broth
  • 1 tsp fresh oregano, chopped (or 1/2 tsp dried)
  • 1 tsp fresh thyme, chopped (or 1/2 tsp dried)
  • Salt and pepper to taste

Instructions

  1. Cut the sausage into 1/4-inch slices. The sausage we used was raw, so I found it easier to cook it in the skillet on two sides for a bit, then pull it back out and slice it up.
  2. In a large skillet over medium-high heat, cook the sausages, turning frequently, until browned on both sides. Remove the browned sausage with a slotted spoon and put it in the slow cooker.
  3. Remove some of the rendered fat, leaving a few tablespoons (that’s optional, although if it’s not from pastured pork, I’d do it). Add the clarified butter and the onions to the skillet and saute for a couple of minutes until translucent. Add the peppers and garlic and cook for another 3 to 5 minutes.
  4. Dump the cooked veggies into the slow cooker. Top with the tomatoes and broth, then sprinkle the oregano and thyme on top. Cover and cool on low for 5 hours or on high for 3 hours. Season with salt and pepper as needed.

Notes

You could eat this by itself, over a bed of cauliflower “rice”, mixed with some broccoli (I love how the juices get absorbed into the “leafy” part), or just over a bed of wilted greens like spinach or kale.


Paleo Slow Cooking by Dominique DeVito

You may have noticed that we’re using a new recipe format on the site. It gives you a printable option, and it also lets you save the recipe to your Ziplist account. Please leave a comment below and let me know whether or not you like it, and if you prefer we just stick with the way we used to do recipes.

Slow Carb and Paleo Recipes and Tips for the Holiday Season

I know you’re all getting ready for the holiday season and that normally means food.  Lots and lots of food.  And potential to pack on a few pounds that never really go away.

No one wants that, do they?

Keep the menu lean and healthy with one of these holiday recipe ideas put out by some friends of the Slow Carb Foodie.

A fantastic almost freebie from Jason over at Finding My Fitness (and a regular contributor here) has put together an ebook with Thanksgiving tips and tricks for Slow Carb and Paleo eating so you and your family can enjoy a happy and healthy holiday.  Since the date is fast approaching, he’s lowered the price to $1 – a steal!  Even if you miss it, check it out for the rest of the holiday season.  There’s 7 pages on preparing the perfect poultry,  7 scrumptious sides, 6 decadent desserts, 3 delicious drinks!  You’ll be set for the rest of 2012.

Looking for a healthy way to stuff your bird?

Check out this recipe for Paleo “rice” stuffing – made with cauliflower.  Looks yum!

Need some fresh ideas for what to do with your turkey leftovers?

This looks like a super easy recipe for Turkey and Black Bean Soup (ignore those crackers in the picture!)

Need some post Thanksgiving reading material while you surface from your Turkey coma?

If you were somehow under a rock and haven’t heard, Tim Ferris has just released the Four Hour Chef.  I’ve got mine on my Kindle and can’t wait to start reading this weekend.  Make sure you order a hardcopy (or the digital version!)

For those of you in the US, I hope you all have a happy and healthy Thanksgiving holiday.  I’m on vacation in tropical Northern Queensland, Australia for the week, so no Turkey for me.  I’ve been enjoying (a few too many) cocktails, doing some business planning for 2013 and trying to relax by the pool.  Next week I’ll be back to Melbourne, and looking forward to finally enjoying some summer weather.

Paleo Holiday Recipes

Guilt-Free Egg Nog For The Holidays!

Paleo egg nogThis is a guest post from Jason of Finding My Fitness

It’s crazy to think that you can go to the grocery store and see Christmas decorations already (at least here in the U.S.).

Around this time, I usually love to start drinking egg nog. There’s a problem though.

I can’t stand it anymore.

That’s not entirely true. I love it in theory. But then I start drinking it, and it’s so sweet that I can’t take much of it. Plus it’s too thick for me. I’ve given up milk for water long ago.

Then I found a recipe on Mark’s Daily Apple for a Primal Egg Nog. It’s a good recipe, but it needed a bit of help for my palate. This one is totally dairy free and uses honey instead of syrup.

Here’s my mostly-paleo, even sort-of-slow-carb egg nog. I hope you like it!

Ingredients

  • 3 cups coconut milk, divided
  • 4 egg yolks, beaten
  • 1-2 tbsp organic honey (depending on how sweet you want it)
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • ground nutmeg or cinnamon for garnish

Directions

  1. In a saucepan, combine the egg yolks, 2 cups of coconut milk, and honey.
  2. Over a medium-low heat, stir the milk continually until it starts to thicken, about 10 minutes. It’s important to gently stir the whole time.
  3. When it’s done with the heating, cool it in an ice bath until it gets to room temperature. You have to cool it quickly so the yolks don’t cook. Keep stirring for a few minutes.
  4. At this point, add the rest of the coconut milk and the vanilla. Maybe even a dash of nutmeg. Stir well.
  5. Before serving, garnish with some nutmeg or cinnamon.

Play around with the sweetness. Err on the side of less and adjust up.

I love that this egg nog is thick but doesn’t seem to coat your mouth in a film like its dairy counterpart does. And it doesn’t put you into a diabetic coma.

And especially if you love coconut, this will be right up your alley!

Incidentally, I’m just about finished with a Thanksgiving Recipe e-book, and this is one of my featured recipes. If you want to have a healthy Holiday season, this is an e-book for you.

Folks on my mailing list will hear about it first and get a hefty discount, so if you’re interested, you might want to get on the list. You’ll also get 10 of my favorite slow-carb recipes as a thank-you for signing up.

Happy holidays!

I’d love to hear from you. What is your favorite holiday-time drink? How can you modify it to fit within paleo/slow-carb guidelines?

-j

Jason has been overweight his whole life and is on a journey to being healthy and fit. He writes about his 4 Hour Body adventures with tips, encouragement, and advice on FindingMyFitness.com. Subscribe to his newsletter to get some more great slow-carb recipes!

Slow Carb or Paleo Lemon Herb Chicken

paleo-chicken recipeChicken is a staple for Slow Carb and Paleo eating so I’m always looking for new quick and simple ways to make it taste good.  Herbs are a great way to do that without a lot of fuss.

It’s summer in Australia so while most of you in the Northern Hemisphere are digging into soups, stews and heartier fare of all kind, I’m enjoying fresh, light summer food with the help of the herbs I’m growing on my balcony.  This is a super easy recipe where you can mix and match whatever herbs you have.  I serve it with salad or slightly wilted fresh spinach.

While this is quite a  light chicken dish, you could definitely eat it in winter as well.  Just try serving it with green beans or roasted veggies instead.

Ingredients

  • 4 Chicken Thighs (or 2 Large Chicken Breasts) cut into 2 inch pieces
  • 1 Tbs olive oil or macadamia nut oil
  • Juice from ½ a lemon + a bit of lemon zest
  • 2 Tbs fresh herbs chopped (I used oregano, but basil, thyme, rosemary or tarragon would all be great!)
  • Salt to taste ( I use about 1 tsp sea salt)
Directions
  1. Put all ingredients in a ziplock bag or sealed container
  2. Marinate at least one hour in the fridge (I do mine overnight.)
  3. Heat up a frying pan
  4. Toss chicken in
  5. Cook till done – about 5 minutes


Time-saving tip: Make this in bulk and freeze batches of chicken pre-marinated and then thaw on the day you want to cook it.

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How To Prepare Vegetables Even Your Pickiest Eater Will Love

Slow-carb recipe tips: preparing delicious vegetables
On the slow-carb diet, one thing you’re going to eat more of than you probably ever have before is vegetables.

It seems really obvious, but a lot of people just don’t get it. To lose weight, they eat less calories, and that – to them means smaller portions of bread, fats, and sugars. But really, that’s not the way to do it.

It seems like a secret that no one knows but is right in front of your face. The best way to lose weight is really by eating more: more veggies.

Think about it this way: in a cup of whole oats you have 607 calories and 103 grams of carbohydrate (that’s more carbs that I eat in a day). In a cup of green beans, you have 44 calories and only 10 grams of carbohydrate. Sure, the grains might fill you up more, but that’s what fat and protein is for. I’d take 3 cups of green beans over a cup of oatmeal any day (and I love oatmeal)!

But I don’t like vegetables

I’ve actually heard someone talk about how they’re tired of choking down vegetables. Now, I understand it can get old quick. I can only stand broccoli in my omelet for about a week before I switch it out for spinach or kale. But vegetables could really be an untapped market in weight loss nutrition!

So I want to help out a bit. I’ve learned to love vegetables, and I’m trying different kinds I hadn’t considered before. Maybe one day I’ll write a post about different – and possibly strange – vegetables, but today I’m going to skip ahead to some cooking tips.

You see, loving veggies probably has a lot to do with the way you cook it. Personally, I love the flavor in vegetables. They come packed with a lot on their own. But often the cooking method can really seal the deal.

Roasted

This is a very easy way to prepare some delicious vegetable sides, especially if you’re already roasting some meat besides. They can go in together, and sometimes even in the same pan.

Technique: Prepare your veggies in a single layer on a baking sheet and drizzle a little bit of olive oil and sprinkle some cracked sea salt and pepper on top. Bake in a 375 to 400 degree oven (F) for 15 to 20 minutes or until tender.

Recommendation: Try roasting asparagus, cauliflower, onions, squashes, or sweet potatoes.

Grilled

It won’t be long before we’re all in relatively warm weather and smelling the familiar scent of coals blazing under some delicious meats. You grill because you like the flavor it gives to your chicken or steak. Why not also give that same flavor to your vegetables?

Technique: Much like roasting, toss your vegetables with some olive oil. This helps the browning and helps keep them from sticking too much. Sometimes I’ll form a tray out of aluminum foil if I’m grilling smaller veggies like cherry tomatoes, onions, or sliced peppers, but you can also just lay them right on the grill.

Recommendations: There’s nothing like grilled onions, peppers, zucchini, or eggplant. You have to watch some of the softer ones, though, because they get really soft really quick.

Stir fry

When people see the word “fry”, they automatically think it can’t possibly be healthy. But you know better, and you know that nice fats from oils are an essential part of a solid diet. Because you’re using a hot pan, though, you can’t just use any oil. I recommend using coconut oil or clarified butter when you stir fry.

Technique: To stir fry, use high heat with a few tablespoons of oil. When the pan is hot, toss in your veggies and keep tossing until cooked to your liking. I love to add just a smidge of sesame oil at the end to give it sort of a rich nutty flavor.

Recommendation: Some of my stir fry favorites include cabbage, green beans, and broccoli.

Sautéed

With a nice saute, you can thoroughly heat vegetables without wilting them too much. This is great for vegetables that are soft anyway. Again, you’ll need to use a fat with a high smoke point, like coconut oil or clarified butter.

Technique: Sauté is much like stir fry, only the action isn’t as intense. Heat your pan and a bit of olive oil over a medium-high heat. Toss in your chopped or sliced vegetables, stirring just occasionally.

Recommendation: You’ll love sautéed zucchini (my favorite), tomatoes, onions, and peppers.

Steamed

Most people might say this is the healthiest way to cook vegetables. I really don’t think it matters, except for flavoring purposes. What I like about steaming vegetables is that they won’t take on any extra flavors, and they often beautifully exhibit their natural colors. I love how green broccoli gets when steamed, for example.

When you steam, you’re just a step away from raw. They’re soft enough to not crunch, but still natural enough to show you what their real flavors are.

Technique: You can get steaming inserts for pots, and that’s probably the most recommended way to steam. Basically you add water to your pot, stick the veggies in the steaming tray, and cover. Cook time will depend on the vegetable and your preference. Check it, and when it’s as soft as you want, it’s done.

Alternatively, I’ve steamed veggies in the microwave. In a bowl, you can put a few tablespoons of water and add the vegetables. Most microwaves these days have a “fresh vegetable” button or setting you can use that will pretty much cook them perfectly.

Recommendation: My favorite vegetables to steam are carrots, parsnips, broccoli, and cauliflower.

Raw

Of course you don’t really have to cook your vegetables, now do you? Many vegetables can lose some nutrients in the cooking process, and sometimes their flavor even changes.

When you get your taste buds back under control, you will actually begin to find really delicious flavor in raw vegetables. I personally love to eat raw peppers, carrots, celery, and tomatoes just to name a few. Experiment, and you’ll find a whole new world of flavor!

We want to hear from you! What’s your preferred method of enjoying a nice veggie? Lay it out in the comments!

photo credit: thebittenword.com

Jason spends most of his time writing about his adventures with fitness on the slow-carb and paleo diets at his blog, FindingMyFitness.com. Want even more recipes? Check out his newsletter and get 10 more free slow-carb recipes.

Slow-Carb Recipes for Chicken: 30 Different, Totally Delicious Recipes

photo credit: ruben alexander

Not too long ago, I talked about eggs. Today we talk about the chicken. So I guess we have that answer!

One of the easiest and most versatile proteins you’ll find on the slow-carb diet is chicken. I find it’s the quickest way to a solid slow-carb meal when I don’t know what else to have.

It can be easy to get tired of the same old thing every time, though. In an attempt to help you overcome the boredom, I’ve gone around the internet looking for some of the best chicken recipes and put them in one spot.

To determine what would go on the list of the dozens upon dozens I saw, I answered one question: what would I love to have for dinner tonight?

Here are the internet’s 30 best slow-carb chicken recipes! I had a hard time deciding how to categorize them, but this is what I came up with.

Soups/Salads

Classic Chicken Salad - photo by Riki Shore
photo by Riki Shore

Thai Chicken Salad
Chicken, Leek and Mushroom Soup
African Style Chicken Salad
Classic Chicken Salad

Grilled/Roasted

Slow Carb Chicken RecipeSmoked Fruit & Pistachio Stuffed Chicken
Smoked Pepper & Onion Stuffed Chicken
Tandoori Chicken
Chicken Cordon-Bacon
30-Minute Easy Slow Carb Roast Chicken
Just Chicken and Mushrooms
Jalapeño Dijon Grilled Chicken

International

Slow Carb Chicken Curry RecipeSlow Carb Peppery Chicken Curry
Spicy Balinese Chicken Wings with Sambal
Chicken Korma with Mixed Vegetables
Indian Butter Chicken 4HB Style
Slow Carb Orange Chicken
Oven Barbequed Chicken
Chicken Satay

One-Pot Meals

Rosemary & Spinach ChickenPaleo Chicken Bog
Slow Carb Greek Pot Roasted Chicken
Moroccan Chicken Casserole
Asian-Inspired One Pot Chicken
Rosemary & Spinach Chicken
Southwest Chicken & Beans
Chicken Cacciatore

Miscellaneous

Slow Carb Chicken TendersTaco chicken wings with guac dip
Chicken Tenders: Slow Carb and Paleo Comfort Food
Peggy’s Chicken “Fried” Steak
Coconut Curry Chicken Nuggets
Chicken Livers and Onions

Do you have a favorite chicken recipe? Share it in the comments!

Jason spends most of his time writing about his adventures with fitness on the slow-carb and paleo diets at his blog, FindingMyFitness.com. Want even more recipes? Check out his newsletter and get 10 more free slow-carb recipes.

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Slow Carb and Paleo Party Food

slow-carb-super-bowl-party-foodsSuperbowl can be a landmine of bad food choices on the Slow Carb or Paleo diet if you don’t plan for it.  You can also stick to the plan pretty easily and eat some killer food if you’re up for a bit of prep.

Here’s a few ideas to have a Slow Carb or Paleo friendly Superbowl Menu if you’re looking to keep it “clean” and not blow your eating plan on Super Bowl Sunday.  I’ve hand-picked recipes from my own blog as well as a few of my other favorite food recipes and bloggers.

What will you be eating on Superbowl Sunday?  Will you be sticking to your eating?
Feel free to share your recipes below.

Snacks & Nibbles
Raw veggies with Guacamole or Salsa
Green Olive and Almond Tapenade
Crispy Roasted Chickpeas
Paleo Meatballs
Egg and Pesto Stuffed Tomatoes
Bacon Cups
Bacon Wrapped Asparagus with Cilantro Mayonnaise
Jalapenos: Bacon Wrapped Chicken Stuffed
Shrimp with Sugar-Free Cocktail Sauce
Deviled Eggs or Demoned Eggs
Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms

Salads
Chimichurri Salad
Heart of Palm and Avocado Salad

Full-on  Food
Spicy Bacon Lentils
Asian Lettuce Cups
Korean Grassfed Shortribs
Lamb and Vegetable Kabobs
Almond Crusted Chicken Tenders
Spicy Buffalo Wings
My Favorite Slow Carb Chilli
Mexican Pulled Chicken Stuffed Peppers
Red or Green Thai Curry

Cocktails
Nor Cal Margarita
Vodka Soda with Lime
Red Wine

I hope these recipe ideas inspire.  Or if you’re Slow-Carbing you could just take the day off.  

 

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Chicken Tenders: Slow Carb and Paleo Comfort Food

Slow Carb Chicken TendersChicken Tenders, Chicken Fingers, Chicken Strips, Chicken McNuggets.  Normally we think of these things as breaded, deep-fried (and possibly mechanically-separated, chemical-filled) parcels of junk food.
It doesn’t have to be that way.  Using almond meal and some other seasonings, you can create your own, healthy almond-crusted chicken tenders.
Ingredients
  • 1 cup almond flour
  • Sea Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Other seasonings of choice  (I throw in about a heaped  teaspoon each of onion powder, garlic powder, paprika and oregano.  Feel free to add cayenne, parsley, cajun spice blend or anything you like.)
  • 1 egg
  • 2 large chicken breasts, boneless, skinless, cut in tender-size strips
Directions
1) Pour a cup of almond flour into a zip lock bag (or a dish with high sides that can be shaken around a bit)
2) Add salt, pepper and other seasonings until it smells good to you – we use A LOT.
3) Dip all white meat chicken tender strips into a beaten egg, then lightly coat in flour/seasoning mixture.
4) Broil  (or outside of the US, use the “grill” setting on your oven) on high for 10 minutes, then flip and broil for another 5-8 minutes.
5) They are ready when the coating starts to turn brown on both sides.  Serve with mustard or Slow Carb and Paleo friendly condiments.
Check out our post to learn to make your own Slow Carb and Paleo friendly mayo and ketchup.

Pro Tip:Just about any type of meat you’d normally coat with breadcrumbs can be done with almond meal or any other nut meal. Let your imagination run wild. Fish fillets, pork chops, even an Italian classic chicken parma. Check out our recipe for Walnut Crusted Pork Chops if you’re looking for inspiration.

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9 Egg Recipes For Your Slow Carb Diet

9 ways to cook eggs deliciouslyEggs: roughly 70 of the most awesome calories you can eat. Packed with healthy protein and fat, they’re a really easy way to get the 20g Tim recommends in the morning.

The problem is some people get tired of them. And if you’re like me, you wouldn’t miss anything if you never eat an egg again in your life!

With this post, I’m going to show you nine super tasty ways to prepare your eggs so that they’re not just the same old thing anymore. At the end, I’ll link you to some recipes that use them.

Once you are able to master these techniques, your skills with the egg will lead you to hundreds, maybe thousands of recipes.

Hard Boiled

I won’t tell you how to scramble an egg, but I did want to stick with one of the two basics. The fact is, the perfectly hard boiled egg eludes almost everyone.

It took me a while to get the perfect hard boiled egg, and with practice and a bit of tweaking, you’ll be able to cook one every time.

  1. Place your eggs in a small saucepan and add water to cover.
  2. Bring the water to a boil and let it ride for 7 minutes.
  3. Run cold water into the pan for a couple minutes to cool them down.

Check out Laura’s deviled eggs recipe for one using hard boiled eggs.

Soft Boiled

Soft boiled is pretty much what it sounds like: not quite a hard boiled egg. But just because you cook it less doesn’t mean it’s easier. It’s actually a bit harder, but once you discover the secret it’ll feel easy.

Soft boiled eggYou’ll want the white to be firm and the yolk to be slightly runny (hence soft).

Here’s how you soft-boil an egg:

  1. Bring your water to a boil, and then kick it back to a simmer.
  2. Gently lower your eggs in (so you don’t splash boiling water on yourself) and let them simmer for 5 minutes. If you find 5 isn’t long enough for your tastes, you can leave them in a little longer.
  3. Cool the eggs off under cold running water.
  4. When you eat your egg, cut the top 1/3 or so of your shell and eat the egg out of its shell with a spoon.

I wouldn’t make a soft-boiled egg and store it like I would hard-boiled. Make them when you plan on eating them.

Poached

Poaching an egg basically means boiling it outside of the shell. My first attempt was a disaster, but like many things, it gets easier with practice.

  1. Bring water to a boil in a saucepan. Once it’s boiling, reduce it to a simmer. You don’t want super-active water, but it does need to be very hot.
  2. Crack an egg into a ladle. Using a ladle or big spoon really helps to make sure your egg doesn’t separate in the water.
  3. Gently dip the ladle into the water to submerge the egg and slide it off.
  4. Let your egg cook for about 3 minutes and gently scoop it out to enjoy with your breakfast!

Here’s an Eggs Benedict recipe on Finding My Fitness with your name on it to try out your poaching skills.

Remember: poaching eggs is LEGAL!

Steamed

The first time I had a steamed egg was in a Korean restaurant. It was so tasty, I decided to include it in this little guide.

It’s super simple:

  1. In a heat-safe bowl, like porcelain or glass, whisk your egg and a splash of water so it’s fluffy. You can add (any spices you like) here as well.
  2. Add a couple inches of water in a pot (not so much that water gets in your bowl) and place the bowl in it. Cover the pot and let it simmer over medium-low heat for about 15 minutes.
  3. Quicker but less fancy alternative: cover the bowl with a plate and cook for 3-4 minutes.

I like to add some scallion and garlic to my steamed egg!

Baked

If you’ve got a smaller baking dish (like ramekin cups), this is a great method to try out. I’m not talking about a quiche, although they do also make delicious slow-carb meals.

To bake eggs,

  1. Heat your oven to 325ºF degrees (160ºC).
  2. Crack your eggs into your baking cups and sprinkle with some freshly ground salt and pepper.
  3. Bake for about 10 minutes, or until the yolk is as hard (or soft) as you would like it to be.

Fried

Everyone knows how to fry an egg, but everyone does it differently. What most people do is probably “over easy”, but it’s always fun to try out a few different things. Here are three ways to change up your fried egg.

Sunny-side up

Sunny-side up is possibly the easiest of the bunch. If you like your yolk pretty runny and have trouble flipping the egg without breaking the yolk, this might be your go-to style.

Here’s how I do it:

  1. Heat up your pan on a medium-low heat. You can add a dash of oil or ghee for lube, but if you’ve got a good pan you won’t need it.
  2. Once your pan is hot, crack and drop in your egg being careful not to break the yolk.
  3. Let it cook for 3-4 minutes or until the whites have completely cooked through.
  4. If you want a slightly harder yolk, cover the pan about half way through cooking.

Basted

Basted eggs are very similar to sunny-side up. The difference is that when your whites are almost done, you’ll spoon some of the hot oil or butter over your egg to cook the top a bit.

Over easy/Over hard

This is how I normally cook my fried eggs because I generally like a solid yolk.

Both of these are eggs you flip (as denoted by the word “over”), and the easy or hard bit refers to the yolk.

To go over easy:

  1. Start your egg just like you would for sunny-side up.
  2. When your whites are all but done, gently slide a spatula under the egg and flip it, being careful not to break the yolk.
  3. After a couple minutes, nudge the yolk with your spatula to gauge its doneness. If it’s too jelly-like for you, let it cook a bit longer.
  4. Over easy means the yolk isn’t solid completely. If you want your egg over hard, wait a few more minutes until it cooks through.

Don’t forget to crack some salt and pepper over your eggs while they’re still a bit wet!

A few more egg recipes to get you started

Beyond these techniques, there are many recipes that maybe blend a few kinds. For example, a fritata is essentially a fried scramble that is baked at the end. Quiche is similar to a fritata but usually has more cheese and cream involved.

Here are some of our favorite recipes revolving around eggs:

With these skills, you’ll be able to cook any egg to perfection.

Pro Tip: the absolute best eggs you can get will come from chickens who roam around the yard, preferably your yard, eating bugs and grass. The omega-3 content will be much higher, and the omega-6 count will be much lower.

But we can’t expect that to be in everyone’s grasp, so the next best kind will be the ones you find at Whole Foods and places like that that call their eggs come from cage-free chickens with a grassy, organic diet.

The ones I usually end up with, though, are omega-3 enhanced eggs. Eggland’s Best makes some, and you can get them at Sam’s club for relatively cheap. In my opinion, eggs are the easiest and most economical way to work to balance out your omega-3/6 ratio.

Do you have any egg prep secrets you can share with the group? If so, leave some in the comments!

Jason spends most of his time writing about his adventures with fitness on the slow-carb and paleo diets at his blog, FindingMyFitness.com. Want even more recipes? Check out his newsletter and get 10 more free slow-carb recipes.

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