Slow Carb and Paleo Party Food

slow-carb-super-bowl-party-foodsSuperbowl can be a landmine of bad food choices on the Slow Carb or Paleo diet if you don’t plan for it.  You can also stick to the plan pretty easily and eat some killer food if you’re up for a bit of prep.

Here’s a few ideas to have a Slow Carb or Paleo friendly Superbowl Menu if you’re looking to keep it “clean” and not blow your eating plan on Super Bowl Sunday.  I’ve hand-picked recipes from my own blog as well as a few of my other favorite food recipes and bloggers.

What will you be eating on Superbowl Sunday?  Will you be sticking to your eating?
Feel free to share your recipes below.

Snacks & Nibbles
Raw veggies with Guacamole or Salsa
Green Olive and Almond Tapenade
Crispy Roasted Chickpeas
Paleo Meatballs
Egg and Pesto Stuffed Tomatoes
Bacon Cups
Bacon Wrapped Asparagus with Cilantro Mayonnaise
Jalapenos: Bacon Wrapped Chicken Stuffed
Shrimp with Sugar-Free Cocktail Sauce
Deviled Eggs or Demoned Eggs
Stuffed Portabella Mushrooms

Salads
Chimichurri Salad
Heart of Palm and Avocado Salad

Full-on  Food
Spicy Bacon Lentils
Asian Lettuce Cups
Korean Grassfed Shortribs
Lamb and Vegetable Kabobs
Almond Crusted Chicken Tenders
Spicy Buffalo Wings
My Favorite Slow Carb Chilli
Mexican Pulled Chicken Stuffed Peppers
Red or Green Thai Curry

Cocktails
Nor Cal Margarita
Vodka Soda with Lime
Red Wine

I hope these recipe ideas inspire.  Or if you’re Slow-Carbing you could just take the day off.  

 

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Chicken Tenders: Slow Carb and Paleo Comfort Food

Slow Carb Chicken TendersChicken Tenders, Chicken Fingers, Chicken Strips, Chicken McNuggets.  Normally we think of these things as breaded, deep-fried (and possibly mechanically-separated, chemical-filled) parcels of junk food.
It doesn’t have to be that way.  Using almond meal and some other seasonings, you can create your own, healthy almond-crusted chicken tenders.
Ingredients
  • 1 cup almond flour
  • Sea Salt to taste
  • Black Pepper to taste
  • Other seasonings of choice  (I throw in about a heaped  teaspoon each of onion powder, garlic powder, paprika and oregano.  Feel free to add cayenne, parsley, cajun spice blend or anything you like.)
  • 1 egg
  • 2 large chicken breasts, boneless, skinless, cut in tender-size strips
Directions
1) Pour a cup of almond flour into a zip lock bag (or a dish with high sides that can be shaken around a bit)
2) Add salt, pepper and other seasonings until it smells good to you – we use A LOT.
3) Dip all white meat chicken tender strips into a beaten egg, then lightly coat in flour/seasoning mixture.
4) Broil  (or outside of the US, use the “grill” setting on your oven) on high for 10 minutes, then flip and broil for another 5-8 minutes.
5) They are ready when the coating starts to turn brown on both sides.  Serve with mustard or Slow Carb and Paleo friendly condiments.
Check out our post to learn to make your own Slow Carb and Paleo friendly mayo and ketchup.

Pro Tip:Just about any type of meat you’d normally coat with breadcrumbs can be done with almond meal or any other nut meal. Let your imagination run wild. Fish fillets, pork chops, even an Italian classic chicken parma. Check out our recipe for Walnut Crusted Pork Chops if you’re looking for inspiration.

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9 Egg Recipes For Your Slow Carb Diet

9 ways to cook eggs deliciouslyEggs: roughly 70 of the most awesome calories you can eat. Packed with healthy protein and fat, they’re a really easy way to get the 20g Tim recommends in the morning.

The problem is some people get tired of them. And if you’re like me, you wouldn’t miss anything if you never eat an egg again in your life!

With this post, I’m going to show you nine super tasty ways to prepare your eggs so that they’re not just the same old thing anymore. At the end, I’ll link you to some recipes that use them.

Once you are able to master these techniques, your skills with the egg will lead you to hundreds, maybe thousands of recipes.

Hard Boiled

I won’t tell you how to scramble an egg, but I did want to stick with one of the two basics. The fact is, the perfectly hard boiled egg eludes almost everyone.

It took me a while to get the perfect hard boiled egg, and with practice and a bit of tweaking, you’ll be able to cook one every time.

  1. Place your eggs in a small saucepan and add water to cover.
  2. Bring the water to a boil and let it ride for 7 minutes.
  3. Run cold water into the pan for a couple minutes to cool them down.

Check out Laura’s deviled eggs recipe for one using hard boiled eggs.

Soft Boiled

Soft boiled is pretty much what it sounds like: not quite a hard boiled egg. But just because you cook it less doesn’t mean it’s easier. It’s actually a bit harder, but once you discover the secret it’ll feel easy.

Soft boiled eggYou’ll want the white to be firm and the yolk to be slightly runny (hence soft).

Here’s how you soft-boil an egg:

  1. Bring your water to a boil, and then kick it back to a simmer.
  2. Gently lower your eggs in (so you don’t splash boiling water on yourself) and let them simmer for 5 minutes. If you find 5 isn’t long enough for your tastes, you can leave them in a little longer.
  3. Cool the eggs off under cold running water.
  4. When you eat your egg, cut the top 1/3 or so of your shell and eat the egg out of its shell with a spoon.

I wouldn’t make a soft-boiled egg and store it like I would hard-boiled. Make them when you plan on eating them.

Poached

Poaching an egg basically means boiling it outside of the shell. My first attempt was a disaster, but like many things, it gets easier with practice.

  1. Bring water to a boil in a saucepan. Once it’s boiling, reduce it to a simmer. You don’t want super-active water, but it does need to be very hot.
  2. Crack an egg into a ladle. Using a ladle or big spoon really helps to make sure your egg doesn’t separate in the water.
  3. Gently dip the ladle into the water to submerge the egg and slide it off.
  4. Let your egg cook for about 3 minutes and gently scoop it out to enjoy with your breakfast!

Here’s an Eggs Benedict recipe on Finding My Fitness with your name on it to try out your poaching skills.

Remember: poaching eggs is LEGAL!

Steamed

The first time I had a steamed egg was in a Korean restaurant. It was so tasty, I decided to include it in this little guide.

It’s super simple:

  1. In a heat-safe bowl, like porcelain or glass, whisk your egg and a splash of water so it’s fluffy. You can add (any spices you like) here as well.
  2. Add a couple inches of water in a pot (not so much that water gets in your bowl) and place the bowl in it. Cover the pot and let it simmer over medium-low heat for about 15 minutes.
  3. Quicker but less fancy alternative: cover the bowl with a plate and cook for 3-4 minutes.

I like to add some scallion and garlic to my steamed egg!

Baked

If you’ve got a smaller baking dish (like ramekin cups), this is a great method to try out. I’m not talking about a quiche, although they do also make delicious slow-carb meals.

To bake eggs,

  1. Heat your oven to 325ºF degrees (160ºC).
  2. Crack your eggs into your baking cups and sprinkle with some freshly ground salt and pepper.
  3. Bake for about 10 minutes, or until the yolk is as hard (or soft) as you would like it to be.

Fried

Everyone knows how to fry an egg, but everyone does it differently. What most people do is probably “over easy”, but it’s always fun to try out a few different things. Here are three ways to change up your fried egg.

Sunny-side up

Sunny-side up is possibly the easiest of the bunch. If you like your yolk pretty runny and have trouble flipping the egg without breaking the yolk, this might be your go-to style.

Here’s how I do it:

  1. Heat up your pan on a medium-low heat. You can add a dash of oil or ghee for lube, but if you’ve got a good pan you won’t need it.
  2. Once your pan is hot, crack and drop in your egg being careful not to break the yolk.
  3. Let it cook for 3-4 minutes or until the whites have completely cooked through.
  4. If you want a slightly harder yolk, cover the pan about half way through cooking.

Basted

Basted eggs are very similar to sunny-side up. The difference is that when your whites are almost done, you’ll spoon some of the hot oil or butter over your egg to cook the top a bit.

Over easy/Over hard

This is how I normally cook my fried eggs because I generally like a solid yolk.

Both of these are eggs you flip (as denoted by the word “over”), and the easy or hard bit refers to the yolk.

To go over easy:

  1. Start your egg just like you would for sunny-side up.
  2. When your whites are all but done, gently slide a spatula under the egg and flip it, being careful not to break the yolk.
  3. After a couple minutes, nudge the yolk with your spatula to gauge its doneness. If it’s too jelly-like for you, let it cook a bit longer.
  4. Over easy means the yolk isn’t solid completely. If you want your egg over hard, wait a few more minutes until it cooks through.

Don’t forget to crack some salt and pepper over your eggs while they’re still a bit wet!

A few more egg recipes to get you started

Beyond these techniques, there are many recipes that maybe blend a few kinds. For example, a fritata is essentially a fried scramble that is baked at the end. Quiche is similar to a fritata but usually has more cheese and cream involved.

Here are some of our favorite recipes revolving around eggs:

With these skills, you’ll be able to cook any egg to perfection.

Pro Tip: the absolute best eggs you can get will come from chickens who roam around the yard, preferably your yard, eating bugs and grass. The omega-3 content will be much higher, and the omega-6 count will be much lower.

But we can’t expect that to be in everyone’s grasp, so the next best kind will be the ones you find at Whole Foods and places like that that call their eggs come from cage-free chickens with a grassy, organic diet.

The ones I usually end up with, though, are omega-3 enhanced eggs. Eggland’s Best makes some, and you can get them at Sam’s club for relatively cheap. In my opinion, eggs are the easiest and most economical way to work to balance out your omega-3/6 ratio.

Do you have any egg prep secrets you can share with the group? If so, leave some in the comments!

Jason spends most of his time writing about his adventures with fitness on the slow-carb and paleo diets at his blog, FindingMyFitness.com. Want even more recipes? Check out his newsletter and get 10 more free slow-carb recipes.

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Slow Carb or Paleo Chimichurri Salad

Chimichurri is a flavor-packed sauce or marinade from Argentina.  Since I’m trying to eat more raw veggies, I decided to take a typical marinade and build a super healthy salad around it.

Don’t be intimidated by the large number of ingredients.  This is really easy.

Time Saving Tip: You can make extra chimichurri and freeze batches for later.

Paleo Chimichurri Salad Recipe
Slow Carb or Paleo Chimichurri Salad

Salad Ingredients

  • 10-12 oz meat of your choice, cut into chunks or strips (chicken, beef or pork work well)
  • 4 cups baby spinach
  • ½ red onion, thinly sliced
  • ½ cup cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
  • ½ red bell pepper cut into strips
  • ½ avocado cut into cubes

Chimichurri Marinade Ingredients

  • ½  cup cilantro leaves (coriander here in Australia)
  • ¼  cup fresh mint leaves
  • ¼  cup flat-leaf parsley
  • 3 cloves fresh garlic, finely chopped
  • ¼  teaspoon hot pepper flakes
  • ¼  cup of olive oil
  • Splash of vinegar or lime juice
  • Sea salt and pepper to taste

Directions

  1. Prepare the chimichurri marinade. Chop all the herbs.  Combine the herbs and garlic in a bowl.  Alternatively, you could use a food processor if you want a smoother marinade/dressing. Add the oil and a splash of vinegar or lime. Correct the seasoning, adding salt or vinegar, to taste. The chimichurri should be highly seasoned.
  2. Pour a 1/2 of the chimichurri into a baking dish just large enough to hold the meat you want to marinade.  Add meat.  Cover and store in the fridge for a few hours (at least 30 minutes!)  Set the rest of the chimichurri aside.
  3. Heat up a large skillet.   Cook meat until thoroughly cooked (3-5 minutes should do.)  If cooking steak, you can leave medium rare.
  4. Combine veggies in a large salad bowl.  Toss with the chimichurri you set aside.  Add meat.  Serve and top with sprigs of cilantro.

Slow Carb and Paleo Spicy Balinese Chicken with Sambal

Today’s Slow Carb recipe is inspired by my recent trip to Indonesia.  First I’d like to apologize.  I know it’s been ages since I last posted.  I’ve been pretty consumed with other projects as well as a few weeks on vacation.  I plan to resume posting and make some bigger changes to the format of the site in November.

I’ll also confess, I did not stick to my Slow Carb eating while I was away.  I made the decision not to before I left.   I was going for a big wedding, and well… it’s vacation.

I’d actually planned to stay gluten free, but a week spent in a little town in Java with only beer (no wine or liquor) at the local stores had me drinking beer again after over a year of no beer.

Oh well.  I’m back – off the beer, eating healthy again and inspired with some new flavors.

Now back to the food.  I really don’t remember Indonesian food being as good when I visited Bali a few years ago.  I remember it being pretty blah compared to other Southeast Asian cuisine.  That was before I discovered the range of sambals and all of the different types of regional cuisine you can get in Java.

Feel free to email me if you’d like some tips, especially if you love spicy food!

Now on to today’s recipe.  This chicken dish is out of this world.  It can be served on its own or with a spicy sambal.  I’ve provided recipes for both.

The chicken component of dish is borrowed from Almost Bourdain (who adapted it from Bill Granger’s Bills Sydney Food).  I think we share fairly similar taste in food.

It’s probably a bit too much work for a Wednesday night, but if you’re in the mood to entertain, you could do a whole theme meal around it.

*** Alternatively, you could just make a big jar of sambal and throw it on chicken or lentils or anything you want to liven up throughout the week.  In Indonesia they just keep jars of this stuff in the kitchen with all different levels of intensity.

Paleo Balinese Fried Chicken
Slow Carb and Paleo Balinese Fried Chicken

Balinese Spicy Fried Chicken

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 cup coconut milk
3 kaffir lime leaves, or zest of 1 lime
2 Asian red shallots, roughly chopped
3 cloves garlic, crushed
1 x 2 cm (3/4 in) piece galangal (or ginger) root, sliced ( you could also used ginger in a jar in a pinch)
3 green chillies, roughly chopped
1 tsp turmeric
1 tbsp salt
1 x 1.5 kg (3 lb) chicken, cut into 16 pieces
Oil for frying

Directions

1. Place coconut milk, lime leaves (or zest), shallots, garlic, galangal root (or ginger), chillies, turmeric, salt and 2 1/2 cups (20 fl oz) of water in large saucepan and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Add chicken and cook for 20 minutes or until chicken is tender and just cooked. Remove chicken from saucepan and leave to cool on a wire rack.

2. Heat oil to 3 cm (1 1/4 in) in a wok or deep frying pan on high heat. Cook the chicken in batches, being careful not to overcrowd, until golden. Drain on paper towels. Serve with sambal, cucumber slices and coriander sprigs.

Tomato sambal

Ingredients
4 tablespoons oil of choice
15 shallots, peeled and sliced
10 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced
14 large red chilies, seeds removed, sliced
2 medium-sized tomatoes cut in wedges (I used canned)
2 teaspoons roasted dried shrimp paste
2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice
Sea Salt to taste

Directions

1. Heat oil in a heavy saucepan or wok. Add shallots and garlic and sauté 5 minutes over low heat. Add chillies and sauté another 5 minutes.  Add tomatoes and shrimp paste and simmer for another 10 minutes. Add lime juice.

2. Put all ingredients in a food processor and puree coarsely. Season to taste with salt. Cool before using. You can freeze leftovers or keep in the fridge and use on meat or vegetables throughout the week.

Slow Carb and Paleo Asian Lettuce Wraps

I love Asian food, but going out to eat regularly just isn’t an option when you have no idea what is going into your food and have no control over it.

Sure, some items on the menu are going to be better than others, and they certainly aren’t as bad as downing a loaf of bed, but when you’re trying to be strict with your Slow Carb or Paleo diet, these little sneaky condiments can completely derail all your positive efforts.

Lots of restaurant Asian dishes contain MSG and sugar.  Most contain soy sauce and/or oyster sauce, both of which have wheat/gluten in them.

This is an easy mid-week meal I can prep in about 15 minutes when I’m craving Asian food and don’t want to worry about “mystery ingredients”.  I love this recipe because it is so simple to switch up the flavor combos  with different spices or add whatever veggies you have sitting in the fridge.  It also travels well for work-lunch leftovers and can be eaten hot or cold.

Slow Carb or Paleo Lettuce Cups

Ingredients

  • Lettuce leaves (Boston lettuce or Napa Cabbage works well)
  • 1 Tbs macadamia nut oil
  • 1lb ground meat (works well with ground turkey, chicken or pork mince)
  • Minced garlic 1-5 cloves (I use about 5 cloves, but not everyone likes garlic like I do!)
  • ½ Red Onion or 1-2 shallot, finely chopped
  • ½ Tbs ginger, finely minced (I use fresh if I have it, but out of a jar is fine too)
  • 1 Tbs tamari or soy sauce (preferably gluten free!)
  • Cilantro (or coriander as they call it down under) to garnish.  You could also use Thai basil or mint.
  • Chilli Garlic Paste or Sambal Oelek to taste

***Extras and variations***

For some extra protein and crunch, I add chopped nuts at the very end.  Peanuts work well for Slow Carb-ers.  For Paleo-ites, try macadamia nuts.

Diced veggies like zucchini, green beans or mushrooms (or whatever is about to go “off” in your fridge) make great add-ins.  Just toss them in for a few minutes after you’ve added the spices and sauces!

For super crunchy shells, I’ll sometimes use raw cabbage.  It’s sweet and doesn’t fall apart as easily as lettuce.

Directions

  1. Heat oil in a large fry pan on medium high.  Add onion  and cook till translucent but not too soft (about 2 minutes).  Add garlic and ginger and cook or another minute being careful not to burn garlic.
  2. Add meat and cook until browned.  Drain any excess grease if you wish.  I usually don’t have much, so I’ll leave it in for flavor.
  3. Add soy sauce/tamari and chilli paste
  4. Add any extras you wish.  I normally add chopped nuts and cilantro.  Sometimes I’ll add some fish sauce or a squeeze of lime.  Zucchini and mushrooms are great too if you’re looking to add more veggies.
  5. Put filling into a serving bowl and serve in lettuce cups.

Guest Post: Blackened Tilapia over Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

Slow Carb Blackened Tilapia with Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

After a brief posting hiatus while I was visiting friends and family in California, I’ve returned to Melbourne and am back to eating healthy (and blogging about it.)   Today’s recipe is a guest post from Brian Valentin over at Four Hour Body Zone. Brian blogs about his experiences on the Slow Carb Diet and Paleo eating plans as well as other health and fitness related topics.

Brian and I started the Slow Carb Diet around the same time so following his journey has been invaluable to my own experience. Like me, Brian’s continued to adjust and tweak the diet in order to figure out what works best for him, and by doing so, the rest of us are able to learn from his experiences. If you haven’t checked out his blog, I highly encourage you to do so.

The typical western diet is very high in Omega 6 fats – the ideal ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3 is basically 1:1 or 2:1 at worst. For most of us,we are running somewhere in the 15:1 or 20:1 range! One way to fix that ratio is to supplement with Omega 3 Fish Oil supplements – but another tastier way to increase our Omega 3’s is to eat good fatty fish and seafood.

I’ve never been much of a seafood eater even when growing up on Long Island where there was a lot of fresh seafood available. Now that I’m landlocked, there is even less options for someone trying to experiment with seafood. I tend to stick to frozen fish as that’s the most available fish around here. I also prefer to eat the milder fish that I can add flavors to – so when I eat fish it tends to be tilapia, but I’ve also found that I enjoy salmon too.

This recipe is one that I heard the basis of while listening to an NPR piece about fish markets and a chef that was being interviewed described a simple preparation he makes. This is my version of that – it has a lot more added to it, but it is still a pretty simple dish.

Blackened Tilapia over Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

Slow Carb Blackened Tilapia with Roasted Cherry Tomatoes
Blackened Tilapia with Roasted Cherry Tomatoes

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/4 small onion – thinly sliced
  • 1/2 tsp minced garlic (or 1 clove minced)
  • pinch red pepper flakes
  • 7-8 cherry tomatoes, sliced in half
  • 1-2 fish fillet – fresh or frozen (I used frozen tilapia – salmon would work well too)
  • blackened seasoning
  • salt/pepper to taste
  • pat of butter – grass fed butter is best if available (optional)
  • squeeze of lemon (optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 375.

  1. Heat olive oil in an oven proof skillet over med heat, add onion, garlic, and red pepper flakes and pinch of salt and saute until soft and onions are translucent – about 5 to 8 minutes.  Add cherry tomatoes to skillet and cook for 5 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, season fish fillets with blackened seasoning.
  3. Move cherry tomatoes to edges of skillet and place fish fillets down in center of skillet.
  4. Place skillet in preheated oven and bake for approximately 12 minutes – flipping fish over halfway through cooking. With about 1 minute left you can add a pat of butter to pan.  When time is up, transfer tomatoes and onions to a plate, then put fish fillets over tomatoes.

If you’d like you can squeeze a little lemon over the fillets.  I prefer to have a large salad and some steamed vegetables with this. If you’re doing slow carb or 4HB style, add 1/2 cup of black beans as a side.

3 Easy and Delicious Slow Carb and Paleo Chicken Recipes

Slow Carb and Paleo Chicken Recipe

I don’t have a lot of time to shop for food during the week, so I keep a lot of frozen chicken in the freezer that I can pull out in the morning so it’ll defrost while I’m off at work. These are a handful of my go-to recipes

Chicken and Mushrooms

This is a simple two-ingredient recipe (excluding your basic pantry items) where the ingredients really shine through. For such a simple recipe with no spices, the taste is shockingly delicious. No really, it is. It made me come to the realization that I tend to drown a chicken and mushroom dish in wine sauce and am normally tasting my sauce, not the ingredients.

Slow Carb and Paleo Chicken and Mushrooms
Chicken and Mushrooms

Check out the video recipe here and go for it. As simple as it is, I promise you won’t be disappointed

FYI – I used chicken thighs (no skin) instead of his recommended chicken breast (skin on), and it turned out great. I’d recommend using free-range organic chicken and organic grass-fed butter. Not necessary, but it’ll make the dish all the more delicious.

Tarragon Chicken

Mmmmmmmm. Total French-cooking comfort food! This is one of those dishes to make you appreciate that you aren’t watching your calories or fat content.

Slow Carb and Paleo Chicken Recipe
Tarragon Chicken

This Nigella Lawson recipe is great for those who want to simplify this traditional French dish.  For those Slow Carb-ing, you may want to halve the cream to keep it within Tim Ferris’ suggested serving size. I don’t bother, but I also don’t make rich dishes like this more than once a week.

Check out the recipe on Food Network here.

Roast Chicken Two Ways

There are so many different ways to roast a chicken, ranging from simply seasoning the bird and popping it in the oven to a bit more complex methods of messing around with special racks, trussing and basting.  It’s a bit overwhelming knowing where to start if you’re a novice chef.

Slow Carb and Paleo Chicken Recipes
Roasted Chicken

When I learned Thomas Keller does a pretty basic roast chicken (no basting, no buttering), it confirmed to me that there is absolutely no reason to get all fancy with it. If it’s good enough for Thomas Keller, it’s good enough for me…and you.

Check out a video as he walks you through it here

Thomas Keller Perfect Roast Chicken

I love that roasting a chicken is a low-involvement process. Once the bird is in the oven, you can set the timer and don’t have to think about it until it’s done.

Now for the chicken “two ways” :

#1 Classic Roast Chicken – If company is coming over, I follow Keller’s basic roast chicken recipe. And, if it’s just for me, sometimes I can’t even be bothered to truss the chicken. Instead I simply turn it upside down so the breasts are on the bottom (keeps them juicy), season with salt and pepper and roast it. It’s still pretty good.
#2 Curry Roasted Chicken – For those times, when a roast chicken sounds a bit blah, and I’m looking for some kick, I use this equally simple method. Find a jar of curry paste with no added sugar or other fillers (check ingredients and carb counts.) I use Valcom.  Coat the chicken with paste and roast on the bottom rack of your oven for approximately 50 minutes at 425F.

On occassion, I’ll make fresh curry paste, but it’s a bit of an effort so if I do that, I’ll normally use the paste to make an actual curry.  This is really just a quick fix.

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Bun-less Burgers Two Ways

Slow Carb Paleo Burger

Whether you’re Paleo, Primal or Slow Carb, you aren’t going to be having a bun with your burger.  My philosophy is – if you top your burger right, you won’t even miss the bun, or the sugar-y condiments.  Here are two of my favorite combinations for inspiration.

My burger recipe is simple, just a little sea salt and pepper with high quality grass-fed organic beef cooked to medium rare, served with killer toppings.  By all means, make it with ground turkey, buffalo or lamb if you prefer.

Serves 4 (or 6 depending on who is eating!)

Burger Ingredients

  • 1lb beef mince
  • 2 cloves of garlic
  • Sea Salt and Fresh Ground Pepper to taste

Burger Directions

Mix ingredients in a bowl. Form patties of uniform shape and size.  Grill on the BBQ or in a frying pan with a bit of oil.

Now for the fun part… here are a few suggestions on how to make your burger more interesting.

Classic Burger with Sautéed Mushrooms and Bell Peppers over Garlic Cauliflower Mash

Slow Carb Paleo Burger
Burger with Sautéed Mushrooms and Bell Peppers over Garlic Cauliflower Mash


Ingredients

  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped into long strips
  • 1 large onion, chopped into long strips
  • 1 head of cauliflower, chopped into florets
  • 1 cup of chicken stock (make sure there are no additives)
  • Sea Salt and Fresh Ground Pepper to taste
  • Optional: ghee or parmesan cheese

Directions

  1. Sauté sliced mushrooms and onions in a bit of oil or ghee until tender (or even go for crispy if you like them a bit caramelized.
  2. Put cauliflower florets into a pot of water.  I generally fill the pot an inch or two with chicken  stock or broth to give the florets something to steam in.  Put a lid on the pot and turn heat to medium high.  Steam the florets in the broth for about 4-5 minutes until tender (I open up the pot and poke them with a fork to check.)
  3. Once tender, use an hand blender to blend until smooth.  If you don’t have a hand blender, you can toss the cauliflower and liquid into a normal blender, but BE CAREFUL and make sure the top is on.  You don’t want a face full of steaming hot faux cauliflower.
  4. Season with salt and pepper.  If you’d like something a bit richer, you can add ghee and/or a bit of parmesan cheese (depending on if your diet allows.)
  5. Serve the meal by placing the burger over the cauliflower and topping with the onions and peppers.

Bacon and Egg Burger with Sautéed Mushrooms and Onions and Avocado Slices on the side

Slow Carb Paleo Bacon and Egg Burger
Bacon and Egg Burger with Sautéed Mushrooms and Onions and Avocado Slices


Ingredients

  • 1 large onion, chopped into long strips
  • 2 cups of mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 egg per burger
  • 1 slice of bacon (the bacon I use in Australia is center cut bacon which is more similar to a Canadian bacon than typical American bacon.)
  • ½ avocado per person

Directions

  1. Sauté sliced mushrooms and onions in a bit of oil or ghee until tender (or even go for crispy if you like them a bit caramelized.
  2. In a separate pan, fry up eggs and bacon.
  3. Serve the meal by placing the burger on the plate and topping with the bacon first, then the egg, then the onions and mushrooms.  If you want to be like the Aussie’s, try adding some beetroot.  I still haven’t figured out the appeal in this, but the people I’m surrounded by seem to love it.
  4. Serve the avocado on the side.

Coriander Lime Salmon

Slow Carb Coriander Lime Salmon Recipe

Normally following a cheat day, I am itching to recharge my body with nutrient-dense superfoods.  For me, this means spinach and salmon.  This could get a little boring after awhile so I try to experiment with various seasonings to keep Sunday dinner interesting.

I’ve tried to take a small tour around the globe to influence  my salmon recipes.  So far I’ve hit:

Indian – Slow Carb Salmon with Garlic and Turmeric

Italian –  Slow Carb Seared Salmon and Capers

Cajun – Slow Carb Blackened Salmon

For this salmon dish, I was looking for a bit of Southeast Asian influence (possibly Thai, though to actually call it Thai and include my Frank’s Red Hot would be a huge stretch!)   In any case, this salmon dish is packed with flavor, yet still light and refreshing.  It’s also quick and easy to make and great served cold if you want to make extra to toss in a salad the next day.

I served mine with some spinach sautéed in a bit of garlic and macadamia nut oil and roasted root vegetables.

Slow Carb Coriander Lime Salmon Recipe
Slow Carb Coriander Lime Salmon

Ingredients

  • 4  salmon fillets (appprox 6 oz)
  • 1/2 t  sea salt
  • 1/8 t  freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 t  ground coriander
  • 2 t olive or macadamia nut oil
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 t lime juice
  • ¼  – ½ t hot pepper sauce (I use Frank’s Red Hot because there’s no added wheat or sugar)

Directions

  1. In a small bowl, combine the salt, pepper and coriander. Sprinkle over salmon.
  2. In a non-stick skillet, add oil.  Once pan and oil are hot, add salmon and cook over medium heat, browning the outside.  This normally takes about 3 minutes on each side but may vary depending on how hot your pan gets. Do not overcook. Salmon does not need to be cooked through at this point as you will continue to cook it.
  3. Add the garlic, lime juice and hot pepper sauce. Reduce heat. Cover and cook 3-4 minutes longer or until fish flakes easily with a fork.  Be careful not to overcook or your salmon will be dry.
  4. Serve immediately.